How to write a business strategy

Writing a business and marketing strategy when you’re a freelance copywriter might sound overwhelming. It might even sound unnecessary. Believe me, it is both simple and necessary!

Why do you need a business strategy? Because with the best intents and purposes, getting your foot on the copywriting ladder can be a bit difficult.

To make the best impact and not become dispirited, it’s good to implement several different tactics at once. Having a plan will help you stand back, look at the overall direction you want to head in, and start moving.

Before we begin

Jot down all your ideas in a notepad for establishing your routine and marketing your services. Once you’ve got an outline, you can type them up in Word.

There’s no set formula but I use a basic table with 3 columns (first column for publications/activities; second for detail; third for deadlines). You can tweak what I suggest to make it work for you and your business – that’s fine!

Content

Your content is the most important thing to your business. But writing to promote your own cause when you’re probably not being ‘paid’ for it can make you likely to waver. By creating a regular plan detailing which days you write for what publications makes it much more likely you’ll stick to it.

Make a table with three columns. In the first, list publications you write for and then list those you would like to write for (there’s a really good article here about planning to approach new publications). In the next column you can go into more detail such as genres/article types. In the final column list the timeframe, such as when you will publish this content or, if you plan to approach a new publication, the deadline you will set to do that by.

Remember, by publications and businesses I mean those you write for under your own name. This plan is about getting your name out there – not any clients that pay you to write their articles anonymously. At present you might only be writing for your blog. Look for websites that take contributions. Even if it’s unpaid, you’ll be getting your name out there and earning lots of experience.

Digital activity and social media

This includes promoting your articles through social media and e-newsletters etc. On your table, detail which digital avenues you work with (e.g. Reddit, LinkedIn, Google+, Facebook, Twitter, your online portfolio…) and next to each one write the days of the week you will promote certain links/campaigns/others’ posts through these avenues.

Try to have something to promote each day (Mon-Fri). For the days when you don’t have original content of your own, ensure you’re reading others’ work and retweeting/sharing. This earns followers and you can highlight the causes/topics you’re interested in.

Remember to use the social media ‘forum’ with respect: interact with other users and post observations. You could even start a regular segment such as your favourite blog or app of the week that you always run on a Friday. It is more engaging for your followers than merely seeing a series of links coming from your account!

And what about starting a monthly e-newsletter through your website? Setting one up is easy with free tools like MailChimp and gives you something free to ‘sell’ to your followers. You can use it to collate your articles from various different publications or even entice followers with articles solely published in your newsletter. Plus you can update your followers with tips, news and offers.

Advertising and promotion

Your copywriting is still a business that can benefit from promotion and advertising. This encompasses print/digital ads, direct mail, sending out a press release

Think about who needs your service. It’ll mostly be other businesses, so where might they find out about you? In your table, list possible publications (e.g. trade magazines, local paper) to advertise in or approach with a press release, as well as businesses you could approach directly with a sales letter, etc.

Then spend an afternoon getting quotes, contacts and artwork deadlines. If you’re going to attend networking events or conferences you’ll need business cards. These are also useful for dropping off in venues where customers can pick them up, such as restaurants, exhibition centres and libraries.

Events

Freelancing can also be a lonely business, so it’s refreshing to make a network of contacts through digital or in-person events. Scour Google for virtual conferences and webinars, and sign up to copywriting websites such as the Pro Copywriter’s Network and Copyblogger, a great way to get information on events. Hootsuite also often has virtual learning sessions helping you learn while connecting with others in your field.

Physical events are also ideal to get you out of the house. A site like Meet Up can help you discover what’s going on in your area that ties in with your interests. List these events under the first column in your table including any dates and activity/materials you want to have completed (i.e. business cards) in advance of them.

Bringing it together

You’ll notice how each field begins to overlap. This is good because you’re drawing connections between your activities. So long as all activities have the same end goal – to bring you more business – they will strengthen each other and, in turn, your brand. It also helps when setting yourself deadlines since one thing usually depends on another.

Next is buying or creating a calendar in Word. Detail everything (so make sure it’s a biggie!). Jot down the days you’re writing for which publications. Then the days you’ll spend devoted to finding new followers, for example, followed by the days you have any events, as well as print deadlines. And so on…

Tip: Use colour-coded keys and back up your calendar with a simple Excel planner like these templates from Hootsuite for more in-depth info on what you’ll be writing each week. That way your main calendar remains like an easy-to-read overview.

From here

Now your strategy is all typed up, scheduled and ready to go, it’s time to implement it. Write down the immediate action points that have arisen from your plan. Use these to inform your workload for the next week or two, to ensure you meet your deadlines.

Don’t forget that your business strategy will evolve over time and regularly need updating.  Depending on how quickly you work, set aside time to update it – every month…or three – whatever helps it stay relevant and progressive for your business.

Finally, good luck! If you have any questions, drop me a comment, I’d be glad to try and answer them.

Next week: I’ll show you how to find your first copywriting clients

9 tips to organise your time

If you’ve just turned freelance, managing your own workload after being office-bound can be scary. Here’s 9 tips to organise your time:

  1. Make lists

Start by jotting down everything you need to do and put it in priority order. That includes both business and personal engagements. The bonus of working from home is being able to shuffle your day. Making lists helps you identify the pockets of time when you will be able to work at your best.

  1. Have a system

Whether that’s Outlook, your phone’s calendar, a scribbled timetable in a notebook or a project management web platform like Trello – break down the day into sections so you literally have an hourly itinerary.

  1. Eat a frog

Mark Twain once wrote, “If you eat a frog first thing in the morning that will probably be the worst thing you do all day.”

Brian Tracy took this idea and wrote a book on how to stop procrastinating – by eating a frog (that thing you’ve been putting off) first thing. That email you’ve been putting off or all those invoices you’ve been meaning to input… Simply set aside an hour and get them all done together. Then you can clear those reminders off your phone and get on with the day!

  1. Variety is the spice of life

Mix up your schedule. Plan time for your own blog activities, any distance-learning courses, exercise, and hobbies etc. I break the day into 2 or 3-hour slots and ensure there is variety throughout the day so that my work doesn’t suffer. Try to schedule time for that big project that’s been on the back burner. If you don’t make a start now, when will you? Spending just one hour a week on it will help you feel more in control.

  1. Take a day off!

Always try to keep 2 days a week free. Freelancers are notorious for working non-stop. When I first started freelancing, I worked almost non-stop for 3 months. Now when work comes in I negotiate deadlines with the client accounting for the fact that I always take Saturday and Sunday for myself.

  1. Take stock

Use the end of the working week to take stock of your progress and what you’re going to achieve next week. I do this on Friday evening. It helps wind things up nicely and means I don’t stress over the weekend because I already have a well thought out POA for Monday. Goals to think about might include scheduling time for that ongoing project or approaching a new publication/client.

  1. Change the scenery

For all its perks, working from home can turn you into a hermit. Why not pinpoint one or two days a week to work outside of the house? I work in cafes and occasionally pubs (only toward the end of the day!) This helps remind you that you’re still a functioning member of society and can provide a valuable source of inspiration.

  1. Use affirmations

Get distracted easily? Devise an affirmation that you can tell yourself every time you sit down to work. It might sound lame but this actually works.

If you tell yourself you’re going to work through without being distracted in order to maximise your time, it acts as an instruction to your brain. When you find yourself absent-mindedly reaching for the internet browser, repeat the affirmation and get back to the job in hand. There’ll be plenty of time for browsing after you’re done.

  1. Get out

If the ideas still aren’t flowing or you find yourself distracted regularly, it’s probably a sign to take a break. Get outside and take a walk round the park, or if it’s raining bake a cake. Do something to take your mind off it. When you come back you’ll be refreshed – it works!

Got your own tips for organising your time effectively while freelancing? Post a comment and share with the world!