What your content marketing can learn from Brexit and the US election

At the start of 2016, we didn’t know that the UK would vote to leave the European Union and the US would vote Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton as their new president. But it’s happened, despite these two causes apparently being the rank outsiders. So what can your content marketing learn from their campaign techniques?

The promise

When you start a campaign, your promise is central to your advertising. With the US election and the EU Referendum, this is the slogan – the chief message. It’s not only what you’re promising your ‘customer’ (or voter), it’s your lead benefit, your call to action, and if you want to know how to construct an effective call to action simply look at these two examples:

  • ‘Make America great again’ (Trump)

  • ‘Take back control’ (Leave campaign)

These slogans worked because they’re full of active, passionate, emotive language. They include the reader and they tell the reader to do something. ‘Hillary for America’, ‘Stronger together’ (Hillary Clinton) and ‘Stronger in’ (Remain) try for the same inclusivity but they just don’t have the driving will.

It’s easier to fight for change

This brings us onto the fact that it’s easier when you’re the underdog – that’s the same whether you’re a football team, a political party or a small business. You might think you’re on the losing side, but if you have the character and the initiative, you’re in luck – people’s innate instinct is to stick up for the little guy (as far as we can reasonably believe that a billionaire counts as a little guy).

Fighting for change, as opposed to preserving the status quo, has a fierce rebellious side that appeals to people’s latent sense of adventure. What will it be like? You’ll never know unless you vote Leave or vote for Trump… If you own a small business, it’s important to play up your underdog status by focusing on what you do differently to the big businesses. Handcrafted, artisanal products are huge USPs here.

Address a problem

The best way to construct your message is to start with the dichotomy of

problem : solution

Unfortunately, for the Remain campaign, they weren’t advocating change as such. Without a problem to rally against, it’s hard to drive an effective marketing campaign. It’s like trying to sell someone the current house they live in, where the owner knows all the faults, over the new flashy one they’ve only ever seen from the street, with the high-security gates and swimming pool (you’re sure you glimpsed a pool). Instead, the Remainers had to focus on preserving the same quality of life – it’s just not as exciting.

On the other hand, the Leave campaign identified a clear problem (immigration) and a clear solution (strengthen the borders – take back control). That’s not to say effective marketing should focus exclusively on negativity, but it can help to relate to your customer’s fears before knowing what the product is that they’ve been waiting for all these years – the product of their dreams that undoes all those fears. And remember, allowing your customer the chance to dream of a better future is a powerful marketing tool.

Use the language of the common people

Were you bogged down in the arguments, facts and stats of the EU Referendum? A handy fact is a great tool to persuade a buyer to purchase, but when your customer can’t see anything but complex arguments, they’re inclined to turn away.

This happened on both sides of the camp in the referendum, and Hillary Clinton has fallen prey to it in the US presidential election. We’ve heard lots of information from Hillary because, let’s face it, she’s the most experienced for the job. Yet Trump won. Have you ever heard Donald Trump utter a fact? No. He doesn’t have to because he can rely on simple, straight-forward, effective statements. And, if you don’t use facts, you don’t have to worry about being proven wrong.

‘You’ doesn’t work all the time

We’re often told in content marketing that appealing to ‘you’ is vital. Whether you’re writing a blog post or an advert – prioritise the reader. This is something the Remain campaign focused on a lot through their emphasis on better jobs.

But the exception to the rule is when you’re trying to activate the masses. Yes ‘you’ helps appeal to the individual, which is why it works well in text, where there is that intimate space between word and reader. But if you’re trying to instigate mass rebellion (or in the business sense, convert a lot of people away from a competitor and towards a new product, company or service) ‘we’ and ‘our’ is much more powerful.

Utilise social media

The Republican and the Leave campaigns have been phenomenal on social media because their simple messages can garner (often anonymous) widespread support quickly. And if they can gather it in huge swathes, people no longer have to feel like they have anything to hide, prompting more supporters to come out of the woodwork and giving credence to the cause.

For politics, social media is an easy way to reach the working classes and younger voters, but for any business, it’s a good way to connect with their customer and get a handle on their core demographic. Social media is an excellent way to distribute viral (shareable) media such as memes, videos, infographics – all of which can be used to promote the cause/business/key message of your campaign.

Always offer a softer middle ground

In all the debate over the EU Referendum and the US election, there have been many, many people expressing dissatisfaction at the lack of a third way. In this age of excess choice, people do not take kindly to having to choose between one thing or another. There is always that feeling of losing out.

In fact, when it comes to voting, many choose to express the third way by spoiling their ballot papers or simply not choosing to vote. In the EU Referendum, turnout was 72% which means roughly one-third of people chose neither to Leave nor Remain.

When you’re giving your customer a choice, such as with a subscription/membership or an offer of some kind, always make sure you provide a third option. This should be a best of both worlds – you will often find the middle choice gets the best results.

Hire a content writer

When you’re planning your next advertising campaign, bear these lessons in mind. Or hire a freelance content writer to take the burden off your hands and write your blog posts, print, social media – or other content – for you. Contact me today for your free quote and follow me on Twitter for the latest insight and offers.

Get 20% off your first copywriting order

The big spending holidays of Halloween, Christmas and Black Friday are looming large on the horizon, which means it’s time you were getting your marketing materials ready.

But if the prospect of writing all that copy, editing it tirelessly and proofing it is daunting, you’ll be glad to hear I’m running a 20% copywriting discount for new customers for a limited time only.

You can save 20% off your first piece of content booked with me. Whether that’s an engaging and SEO targeted About page for your website or a persuasive sales letter promoting a new product.

So what might you redeem your 20% saving on? Perhaps you need…

  • Leaflet or advert copy
  • Press releases
  • An advertorial
  • SEO articles
  • Direct mail
  • Brochure content
  • Blog posts
  • A job advert

Or if there’s anything else you need writing, simply get in touch. We can draw up a brief that gets you exactly what you need.

The process is as easy as 1, 2, 3

  1. Send me a message quoting this blog post with an overview of your business and what your content needs are. Be sure to do it by Friday 30 September 2016 as that’s when this offer ends.
  2. Your consultation and quote will be free, with no obligation to buy. It’s OK, sometimes you simply change your mind. Otherwise, we’ll agree a brief, a deadline and the final cost, minus your 20% discount as a new customer.
  3. Sit back and let me take care of the hard work. What’s more, the first revision is always free of charge.

Is there a catch?

The terms and conditions are pretty simple. You need to be a completely new customer and to place your order with me by Friday 30 September 2016.

I only usually accept one job at a time, so your 20% discount is valid for one-off orders placed at this time. However, you can book up to 4 blog posts, SEO articles or press releases as your first order (you will receive a 20% discount off the price for all 4). If after this you would like to set up a rolling contract, we can do this no problem, but your discount is only valid for your first fixed order of up to 4 posts. This offer does not include proofreading services. (Offer can be removed at any time)

Still not sure if you want to take advantage of this great saving? Find out how you could benefit from a copywriter.

Does your business need a press release?

What’s the point of a press release? Many businesses know publicity is crucial to their success, but they don’t always realise a well-written press release is behind it.

Do you need a press release?

Alongside the free publicity, there could be a range of reasons your business might need a press release writing:

  • Advertising a new service or product that is unique to you
  • Raising awareness of community or charity work you sponsor
  • Alerting customers to a change of location or management
  • Promoting your business with a human interest story about you or your staff
  • Publicising your business by tying your services in with a holiday, event or craze
  • PR crisis management in the case of a bad news story

How can a press release help your business?

A press release not only gives free publicity, it is your chance to put across your best face to the wider community who make up your potential customers.

When well written, a press release will appeal to a journalist (and not be salesy), make a potentially interesting story which would fit their publication, be of benefit to their readers, be positive, give a new take on a familiar angle, and tie in with community or national events.

Should you hire a copywriter to write a press release?

Yes.

The odds of getting your press release picked up increase when you use a copywriter – someone who knows how to put together a release that a journalist or editor wants to see (and can use).

How will a copywriter write your press release?

When you hire a copywriter to write your press release, the process should go as follows:

1, A copywriter will discuss with you the message you want to get across and find out about your company

2, They might suggest tweaking or reframing the story in order to pique a journalist’s interest and make it relevant. Remember, journalists are bombarded with press releases from all segments of business and community daily. Yours has to stand out to be featured.

3, A great copywriter will (with your help) craft a quote that fits perfectly with the message you are putting across.

4, A copywriter will mould the press release into a professional, readable and informative piece that has everything the journalist will need to run the story without needing a follow-up enquiry.

5, If you intend to send a press release to a number of different newspapers, magazines or websites, a copywriter will tailor the release to each publication and target reader.

Will a copywriter send out your press release?

Generally speaking, a copywriter is employed to write your press release. However, if you only want to target a handful of publications, this can usually be arranged for an additional fee. Sending out a press release and targeting, chasing and following up – as well as large media campaigns – are usually the role of a PR company.

Hire me to write your press release

If you hire me, you will get all of the above. I’ve been writing press releases since I worked in theatre marketing. I know the structure, the content and the approach to writing successful press releases, and I also know the best way to put your business across.

Don’t put off that free publicity, contact me today.

Write better copy for your business

Whatever your business, you need great copy to sell it. From product descriptions on your online shop to adverts in the local press – well-crafted words are what will get you noticed and get you sales.

The quickest and most effective way to do this is to hire a copywriter. But if you fancy trying your hand, then here are my 7 tips to write better copy for your business.

  1. Sell the experience
    Nowadays we are bombarded with sales messages. If you’re going to make your product irresistible, you need to make sure it is experience-driven. In short, write about the benefits of what your customer will get rather than just the facts, and start with your biggest selling point.
  2. Build a story
    Creating a story helps push your reader along through your copy and builds their engagement with your product. By story, I don’t just mean a fantasy tale. Have a clearly defined beginning, middle and end to your copy (e.g. start with a product’s rich history and end by showing how it is still beneficial to your customer today).
  3. Hook with headlines
    Your headline should be relevant to the text that follows, but it should also be simple. Headings of around 6 words work best and will be fully visible in Google. Great headlines are active, informative and intriguing. Subheadings should be used to break up a lot of text and keep the reader moving through your copy.
  4. Picture perfect
    Images can help clarify a point and they are visually more appealing than a page full of text. But make sure they are relevant in some way and quality (not just clickbait). There are some websites where you can get license-free images (such as Creative Commons) which are not half bad, but if you want more choice then be prepared to pay and head to somewhere like iStock or Shutterstock.
  5. Keep it short and sweet
    There’s no set amount of words that is perfect to hook your reader. Use as many as it takes to sell your message. However, be aware that unless you’re writing about an academic or technical subject, making your content easy to read hinges on shorter sentences (up to around 16 words) with shorter words (ideally up to two syllables).
  6. Call to action
    It would be pretty silly to spend hours crafting a piece of copy only to forget to include a call to action. This is what gets you sales. In your CTA you need to ask your reader to do something, such as ‘visit our website’, ‘browse our online shop’, ‘download our free ebook’ or ‘sign up to our newsletter’. Anything you can offer your reader (ideally for free) is another incentive for them to act.
  7. Edit, edit, edit…
    Great copy undergoes rounds and round of extensive editing and proofing. Not only do you want to avoid glaringly obvious spelling and grammar mistakes, which plant doubt in your readers’ minds, but you also want to ensure your copy is as fluid, inspiring, engaging and seamless as possible.

A lot of time goes into crafting great copy that gets results. Writing your own is cheaper in the short term, but it can cost you big business if errors and bad writing put off your customers.

If you want to keep your time free to run your business in the best way possible, why not hire a copywriter to write your next webpage, flyer or job advertisement? I can take the hassle off your hands and save you time. Contact me today for a free and informal consultation.