Does your business need a press release?

What’s the point of a press release? Many businesses know publicity is crucial to their success, but they don’t always realise a well-written press release is behind it.

Do you need a press release?

Alongside the free publicity, there could be a range of reasons your business might need a press release writing:

  • Advertising a new service or product that is unique to you
  • Raising awareness of community or charity work you sponsor
  • Alerting customers to a change of location or management
  • Promoting your business with a human interest story about you or your staff
  • Publicising your business by tying your services in with a holiday, event or craze
  • PR crisis management in the case of a bad news story

How can a press release help your business?

A press release not only gives free publicity, it is your chance to put across your best face to the wider community who make up your potential customers.

When well written, a press release will appeal to a journalist (and not be salesy), make a potentially interesting story which would fit their publication, be of benefit to their readers, be positive, give a new take on a familiar angle, and tie in with community or national events.

Should you hire a copywriter to write a press release?

Yes.

The odds of getting your press release picked up increase when you use a copywriter – someone who knows how to put together a release that a journalist or editor wants to see (and can use).

How will a copywriter write your press release?

When you hire a copywriter to write your press release, the process should go as follows:

1, A copywriter will discuss with you the message you want to get across and find out about your company

2, They might suggest tweaking or reframing the story in order to pique a journalist’s interest and make it relevant. Remember, journalists are bombarded with press releases from all segments of business and community daily. Yours has to stand out to be featured.

3, A great copywriter will (with your help) craft a quote that fits perfectly with the message you are putting across.

4, A copywriter will mould the press release into a professional, readable and informative piece that has everything the journalist will need to run the story without needing a follow-up enquiry.

5, If you intend to send a press release to a number of different newspapers, magazines or websites, a copywriter will tailor the release to each publication and target reader.

Will a copywriter send out your press release?

Generally speaking, a copywriter is employed to write your press release. However, if you only want to target a handful of publications, this can usually be arranged for an additional fee. Sending out a press release and targeting, chasing and following up – as well as large media campaigns – are usually the role of a PR company.

Hire me to write your press release

If you hire me, you will get all of the above. I’ve been writing press releases since I worked in theatre marketing. I know the structure, the content and the approach to writing successful press releases, and I also know the best way to put your business across.

Don’t put off that free publicity, contact me today.

How to write your ideal customer profile

If you’re just starting out your copywriting business, it’s a good idea to write an ideal customer profile which helps you define whose business you want to attract.

Copywriters usually offer a b2b service. Since that ideal ‘customer’ is actually another business, your profile should be built around your perfect imaginary business client.

There’s no special formula to writing your ideal customer profile, but here are some questions you can ask yourself to get started.

  1. Describe what you are selling as though to a child.
  2. Do you have any USPs?
  3. Who might benefit from your particular skills? Think about businesses in a certain industry you might have expertise in, your local area, or perhaps even certain members of the public such as educational providers, academics or students.
  4. Can you define a single ideal client? Do you have any conflictions between businesses? If so, write up the pros and cons of each and think about which business would benefit you most. Narrow down your profile to suit them.
  5. What are the benefits for them of using your product?
  6. What do they sell?
  7. Is their product considered a luxury or a necessity?
  8. If a luxury, how would you encourage their potential customers to part with their money? If a necessity, how can you make their product exciting, new and tempting?
  9. Does this business overlap a couple of industries – could it lead to more contacts?
  10. What scale is this business? How many people do they employ? Do they make a modest or a healthy profit?
  11. Does this business need you? Or do they likely already have a marketing department or not realistically have a budget to accommodate hiring a copywriter? How could you tailor your services to their needs and budget?
  12. What are their potential content needs?
  13. What problems does this business face now and in the future? Consider issues such as the economy, skills shortages, changes to the law, environmental pressures, an aging customer base.
  14. How can your skills help them overcome these problems?
  15. What are the benefits for you of working with this business?
  16. Where are they located (what area of the country and are the in the town centre or on the outskirts)?
  17. Describe that business’ ideal customer (remember, your income depends on appealing to their customers’ needs). Are they male/female, what is their age, why do they use this product, where do they live, what is their income?
  18. Think of people you know that might buy from this business.
  19. How long has this company been in business? Are they new and fresh or do they have heritage you can play on?
  20. Are they selling a contemporary service which appeals to a younger audience or a traditional product with an older demographic?
  21. How do they promote themselves and communicate with their customers?
  22. What kind of language do they use?
  23. What are the business’ values? Is it being cutting edge, is it providing a service no one else can, is it providing quality for money?
  24. Can your content help them reach new audiences?
  25. Is there an angle to this business that interests you? Such as its ethical policy, its affiliations, its work in the community. These all make great narratives for copy and press releases.

There are plenty more questions you can ask yourself, and if you wish you can begin another thread relating directly to that business’ customers.

However, you don’t want to get in too deep, but the more you begin to narrow down your ideal customer, the closer you will be to spotting the companies that could use your skills. Once you can show you are close in tone of voice and ideals, you will be in a firm position when you begin approaching these businesses for work.